MATT WORDSWORTH:

Prime Minister, North Korean leader Kim Jong-Un reportedly said the ICBM test was a gift to American bastards on their Independence Day. What threat does North Korea now pose to Australia?

PRIME MINISTER:

It poses a very real threat to peace in our region, this is a very serious escalation of the North Korean threat. Another reckless provocation and we categorically and totally condemn it. This is yet another very dangerous move by North Korea.

MATT WORDSWORTH:

The Turnbull Government is working with Germany to drive new opportunities through the Hamburg G20 Summit.

Chancellor Dr Angela Merkel and I are united in countering terrorism and radicalisation, and agreed to intensify cooperation to tackle this scourge, including through collaboration with industry. Australia and Germany are committed to defeating ISIL, including through coalition efforts in Iraq. We agreed to work together to address cyber threats and to balance protection of communications with public safety.     

PRIME MINISTER:

Well good afternoon and Mathias and I and our party have just had a very valuable meeting with the Chancellor, discussing the progress of the G20.

An enormous amount of work has gone into this great gathering of the 20 largest economies in the world. 

My focus here today, and the focus of all of us here, is to ensure that we continue to defend the collective security of all of the nations represented here today, in the face against terrorism and other threats to the peaceful world order.

PRIME MINISTER:

The Australian diggers fought 100 years ago, near the place of your birth and Brigitte’s, Amiens, to defend France’s liberty. My Grandfather was among them and I remember as a little boy his stories of the trenches, those grim times when he and thousands of other Australians fought and so many died to keep France free. 100 years ago.

That sacrifice is remembered and it’s honoured by the people of France as it is by the people of Australia. It is a great piece of our history.

PRIME MINISTER:

I want to thank again on behalf of myself and Lucy, President Macron and his wife Brigitte for their extraordinary warmth and hospitality and friendship they showed us yesterday and last night at the Élysée Palace.

PRIME MINISTER:

Benjamin Disraeli is a giant of our shared parliamentary tradition.

So I am both grateful and humbled to receive the Disraeli Prize tonight.

Thank you to Dean Godson and the Policy Exchange.

Disraeli entered Parliament in 1837 after four unsuccessful attempts and spent three-quarters of his 44-year parliamentary career in opposition.

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